What Causes SIDS?

“SIDS” (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome) strikes fear into every parent’s heart, and that’s understandable. A normal, healthy baby can go to sleep and never wake up – for seemingly no reason. The medical community isn’t sure exactly what causes SIDS. But that doesn’t mean you’re helpless.

Here are three major risk factors for SIDS, along with ways to reduce them.

  1. Prematurity or low birth weight

Statistically, more premature babies die from SIDS compared to infants born after 37 weeks. The best way to make sure your pregnancy is progressing as it should is to visit a healthcare provider regularly. This allows them to identify and address any issues, so your baby stays in the oven as long as possible.

  1. Smoking

The data isn’t good: Babies whose mothers smoke during pregnancy are three times more likely to die of SIDS, and babies who are regularly around secondhand smoke are two times more likely.* If you are expecting a child, make every effort to quit smoking and keep your baby away from smoky areas. Find out more about how secondhand smoke harms infants. [link to http://www.bootheelbabies.org/secondhand-smoke-really-hurt-baby/]

  1. Unsafe sleep practices

Because SIDS typically occurs during sleep, it’s crucial to have a safe environment for your baby during naps and at night. The ABC’S of Safe Sleep is an easy guide to remember.

Babies sleep best

Alone, on their

Back, in a

Crib, or other

Safe Sleep Surface

This SIDS Awareness Month, resolve to make a difference for babies in your area. Learn how you can help save lives. [link to http://www.bootheelbabies.org/what-you-can-do/]

*Children’s Hospital, St. Louis, Mo.


5 little-known habits that endanger your baby

Accidental death related to unsafe sleep habits is the No. 1 cause of infant mortality in Missouri’s Bootheel. But it’s not just remembering to place your baby on his or her back to sleep or ensuring that your baby’s crib or sleep space meets current safety guidelines (both of which are very important). We know more about the causes of infant death today than we ever have, which makes it critical to educate caregivers on other key factors that put your baby at risk.

Did you know?  

– That blankets or other loose bedding in your baby’s crib are a suffocation hazard?

– That pillows, stuffed toys or crib bumper pads in your baby’s crib are suffocation and choking hazards?

– That babies should never co-sleep with adults, other babies or children?

– That sleeping in a car seat puts your baby at risk for choking and suffocation?

– That babies should only sleep in a crib or other safe sleep surface with a tightly fitted sheet?

Make sure that everyone who cares for your child is aware of these dangers. We’ve made it easy. Just screen shot the list below and text to friends, family and caregivers to help educate them.

BBF_TextShareImageIphone6Size


Q: Do mesh crib bumpers increase my baby’s risk of SIDS?

It’s fairly common knowledge that traditional bumper pads increase infants’ risk of suffocation and SIDS. Recently, though, some businesses have been offering mesh or “breathable” crib bumpers as safe alternatives. But are they really safer?

The American Academy of Pediatrics says, “No.”

Mesh bumper pads allow more air, but they aren’t suffocation-proof. Just like regular crib bumpers, babies can still roll against them, covering their nose and mouth, and not have the strength or motor skills to turn over. This blocks their breathing and may have disastrous consequences.

At present, mesh bumper pads have not been around long enough to conclusively determine if they’re safe. Until that happens, it’s best to not put babies at risk.

If you’re concerned your child might get stuck between the crib slats, make sure the gap is no more than 2 3/8 inches.

Find out how to create the perfect sleep environment for your baby. [link to http://www.bootheelbabies.org/preparing-baby-crib-safety/]


How you can help save lives

This September (like every September) is Infant Mortality Awareness Month – a time for us to shine a spotlight on the issue we’re passionate about every day. Infant mortality is a devastating problem in the Bootheel, with more than 140 babies from six Missouri counties (Dunklin, Mississippi, New Madrid, Pemiscot, Scott and Stoddard) lost in the last nine years.

Almost everyone in the Bootheel has encountered infant mortality in some form – whether as a family member, neighbor or just seeing a report on the local news. Even if you’re not directly connected, the community around you declines when babies are lost.

Resolve to make a difference for your community this month by helping save infants’ lives. Here are a few practical ways you can do that.

Get the facts about infant mortality

The first step is educating yourself on this issue and how losing babies affects your community. Our website BootheelBabies.org has a lot of great information focused specifically on the Bootheel, so you’ll know how to start a conversation about infant mortality in your area.

We recommend starting at BootheelBabies.org/the-problem/ to see firsthand why this issue is important.

Share info

Bootheel Babies & Families is all over the internet – Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest. We frequently share information related to our mission, along with tips for safe sleep, prenatal care, child safety and more. By following us on any or all of these pages and sharing our posts, you’ll help spread our message and provide others with valuable info for their babies.

September is a good time to start sharing, as we’ll be posting info focused on infant mortality all month long.

Learn your ABC’S

No, we don’t mean the kind you learned in elementary school. We’re talking about the ABC’S of Safe Sleep: Babies sleep best

  • Alone, on their
  • Back, in a
  • Crib, or other
  • Safe Sleep Surface

This method of putting babies to bed is proven to significantly reduce their risk of suffocation and SIDS, making it crucial for everyone to know. And it only takes a few minutes to commit to memory.

Thank you for supporting our cause. Like us on Facebook to stay up to date with current information on infant mortality.