How to safely swaddle

Swaddling is a way of snuggly wrapping an infant in a blanket. Although special swaddling blankets are available, a basic receiving blanket will also work. Newborns love to be swaddled because the warmth resembles their mother’s womb. When done correctly, swaddling can be a great way to calm infants and promote sleep.

Babies can be swaddled at night and naptime. To make your baby safe and comfortable, keep these swaddling tips in mind:

– Stop swaddling by two months of age, before babies start to roll over.
– Put babies to sleep on their backs in their own cribs.
– Keep cribs free of blankets, bumper pads, pillows and stuffed animals.
– Check babies for signs of overheating, such as sweat, flushed cheeks and rapid breathing.

And if you’d like to learn more, check out this BabyCenter video: How To Swaddle Video

To learn more about how to help your baby sleep safely, click here

 

Disclaimer: If your baby has a fever or other symptoms, or you have concerns about the growth and development of your child, always seek care with your healthcare provider.


Q: Will getting a new tooth hurt my baby?

Getting new teeth can be uncomfortable for your baby. You may notice more crying around three months as your child starts to teeth, but babies can begin teething anywhere from three to 12 months. Some symptoms to watch for include drooling, redness around the mouth because of drooling, extra coughing or gagging, biting and unusual crying. Babies may also fidget with their faces, wake up in the middle of the night or be too cranky to feed.

While your baby should be fine in the long run, incoming teeth cause more than a little discomfort. Help your baby coax teeth through by

  • Rubbing a clean finger over sore gums. To reduce the spread of germs, cover your finger with a gauze pad.

  • Giving him or her something cool to chew on, such as a washcloth or chilled teething ring. The coldness will numb the pain, like an ice pack.

  • Feeding your baby hard foods if he or she is old enough to eat solid foods. A peeled cucumber or carrot can apply pressure to gums that relieves pain. Usually, a baby cannot eat solid food until four to six months, when he or she can sit up in a high chair

Be patient while your baby endures these new sensations, but always take your baby to a healthcare provider if you suspect there is a different underlying cause.

 

Disclaimer: If your baby has a fever or other symptoms, or you have concerns about the growth and development of your child, always seek care with your healthcare provider.


Q: When will my baby start sleeping through the night?

Newborns sleep approximately two to four hours at a time and will start to sleep for longer periods around four to six months old. However, they probably won’t start sleeping through the night until after the six-month mark. All babies are different, so your baby’s sleeping habits may develop at a faster or slower pace.

To make sure your baby sleeps soundly and safely, place him or her alone in a crib with a firm mattress and tightly fitted sheet.

 

Tips for baby’s safe sleep

  • Babies should always sleep on a firm mattress with a tightly fitted sheet

  • Keep the crib free of stuffed animals, bumper pads, blankets and other objects that pose suffocation hazards

  • Babies should always sleep alone. Do not share a bed with your baby.

  • Always lay your baby on his or her back to sleep.

  • Use an up-to-date crib. In 2011, the federal government introduced new safety standards for crib manufacturers, making newer cribs more sturdy, durable and safe.

Following these tips will help your baby get the sleep he or she needs while reducing the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). To learn more about safe sleep, visit our website: http://www.bootheelbabies.org/safe-sleep/

 Disclaimer: If your baby has a fever or other symptoms, or you have concerns about the growth and development of your child, always seek care with your healthcare provider.


Q: How can I protect my baby during flu season?

Babies are especially vulnerable during flu season, which typically starts in October and lasts through May. In fact, around 20,000 children under five years old are hospitalized with the flu each year.* Follow these tips to reduce your baby’s risk of getting the flu.

  • Keep your baby away from crowded areas and public places as much as possible, especially during his or her first months of life.

  • Disinfect frequently – carts, baskets, steering wheels, toys and other surfaces or items that may host germs. Wash your own hands often, relying on hand sanitizer if you’re unable to wash your hands with soap and water.

  • Do not let people with fevers or other symptoms handle your baby. In fact, it would be best if you do not allow recently ill people in your home or near your baby until they are fully well.

  • Get vaccinated. While babies cannot get vaccinated for the flu until after six months, family members, and mainly Mom, should get the flu vaccine. Reasonably priced vaccines are available at your local health department.

If you suspect your baby might have been exposed, watch for symptoms like loss of appetite, lack of energy, vomiting, diarrhea, sneezing, coughing and congestion. Check your baby frequently for fevers, and schedule an appointment with a healthcare provider as soon as possible. Do NOT give your baby medicine without first consulting your doctor.

 

*Parents magazine

 

Disclaimer: If your baby has a fever or other symptoms, or you have concerns about the growth and development of your child, always seek care from your healthcare provider.